Vaginal Deliveries

Recovery time from a vaginal delivery is usually shorter than the recovery time from a Cesarean section. But sometimes it can take a while, especially if you’ve experienced any lacerations or tears.

The perineum, or the region between the vagina and rectum, is vulnerable to tearing during delivery. Some studies show that women are more likely to tear during their first vaginal delivery, probably because this is the first time the area has been stretched to that degree. But whether it’s your first or your tenth, delivery technique can make a huge difference. One study revealed that if normal, spontaneous vaginal deliveries are unrushed and occur in a controlled setting with a nurse, doctor, or midwife guiding the pushing process, there is a lower risk of obstetrical trauma. Many health experts recommend perineal massage in the weeks prior to delivery as a way to lower the chances of tearing. Unfortunately, some women experience tears despite their own best efforts and the efforts of their health care professional.

Tears and Lacerations

Tears and lacerations vary in severity and are classified accordingly:

• First-degree tears are surface tears that involve the skin of the perineum and the vaginal connective tissue, usually near the vaginal opening. No muscles are involved. Healing time for first-degree tears is rapid, and women usually experience little discomfort. Stitches may or may not be required.

• Second-degree tears are deeper tears that involve the skin, connective tissue, and underlying muscles. Second-degree tears almost always require stitches, and healing time can vary. Most often, the stitches will dissolve on their own. Some women report feeling fine in a matter of weeks, others complain of experiencing pain for longer periods of time.

• Third-degree tears are more severe and involve the skin, connective tissue, and the external anal sphincter muscle, the muscle that you can squeeze to stop yourself from going to the bathroom.

• Fourth-degree tears are the most severe and can involve a tear through both the internal and external anal sphincter muscles and lining of the bowel. These tears often result in the loss of anal sphincter control, as well as fecal urgency and/or incontinence.

While third- and fourth-degree perineal tears are not common, they can happen to anyone. There are a few risk factors which may increase the chances:

• Larger babies

• Occiput posterior deliveries (baby is sunny-side up, or delivered faceup, instead of facedown)

• Nulliparity (delivery of first babies)

• Extended second stage of labor, or if the pushing stage lasts longer than an hour

• Midline episiotomies — unfortunately, some women end up tearing further than the controlled incision

• Forceps delivery

Third- and fourth-degree lacerations can be extremely painful and may interfere with all sorts of activities, including intercourse, for quite some time after delivery. Many women find going to the bathroom, especially having a bowel movement, a huge challenge. One woman with a third-degree tear told me that having bowel movements after her delivery was worse than the actual delivery itself.

The pain can persist for months after the baby arrives. A thorough follow-up is very important, so make sure that you see your health care professional several times after the delivery. Your doctor should examine the area and make sure the anorectal area is functioning properly. For many women, the pain and discomfort will subside within a few months and normal activities, including sex, can be resumed.

Some moms experience uncontrollable gas and/or fecal incontinence down the line. These problems should be brought to the attention of your physician immediately. In some cases, additional treatment may be necessary.

Episiotomies

An episiotomy is a controlled surgical incision made in the perineal area (between the vagina and rectum), prior to the delivery. In the past, the episiotomy was used routinely in order to lower the risk of vaginal tears during deliveries. But because newer studies have shown that these routine episiotomies have no real benefit for the mother, and may actually worsen the outcome and prolong healing time, episiotomies are becoming less common. In fact, several studies reveal that more severe lacerations were associated with the occurrence of an episiotomy.

Despite the new research about episiotomies, some women still get them. And it’s certainly true that in some cases, an episiotomy may be necessary, especially if the baby presents in an unusual position or is overly large; it may also be necessary if the doctor needs to speed up the delivery for health or medical reasons pertaining to the mom and/or the baby.

Recovery from an episiotomy is a lot like the recovery from a tear; it all depends on the extent of the cut or laceration. For most women, the pain and tenderness will subside significantly in one to two months. If a woman experiences a serious tear in addition to the surgical incision, recovery time may be prolonged.

C-section

The recovery from a Cesarean section, or the delivery of a baby through an abdominal incision, varies from woman to woman. In general, recovery time tends to be longer than the time it takes to recover from a normal, vaginal delivery, unless, of course, a severe tear or laceration is involved.

Right off the bat, the incision site will most likely be sore, although some women report that their incision feels numb and tingly. The pain will gradually subside and the numbness should lessen as well (although I’ve spoken to a few women who never fully regained total sensation in that area). Many women also complain of itchiness around the scar during the healing process. If the itchiness becomes intolerable, speak with your health care provider for options. Some doctors will recommend soothing creams, but others do not, so it’s important to get his/her opinion.

Some women who have had a C-section complain of cramps caused by the buildup of gas in the abdomen after surgery. Walking around or light exercise can help. This will usually go away within the first few days post-surgery, but it can linger, especially if you are not moving at all. Speak with your health care professional if it becomes a problem.

Don’t be shocked by the way the incision looks! For many women, seeing a dark red scar on the abdomen can be upsetting. But remember, it fades with time (and will likely look a whole lot better in six to eight weeks) and most doctors make the incision low enough that your pubic hair will eventually cover it.

Certain activities may be difficult right after a C-section; even coughing, sneezing, and laughing can be uncomfortable. Lifting anything heavy is out of the question, and it will be a while before you can have sex again. You also may need to wait to drive a car, especially if you experience pain buckling your seat belt or getting in and out of the car. Getting up and moving are important parts of the healing process, but you shouldn’t expect to run a marathon.

Here’s a good piece of advice: Don’t overdo it! Oftentimes, women don’t seem to realize that they have just had major abdominal surgery and they feel frustrated that they are unable to move around freely or lift heavy things. One woman I spoke to complained that the stairs in her house posed a major challenge. Another woman was upset that she was in too much pain to be able to cook for her older child. It normally takes an average of six to eight weeks to recover completely from a Cesarean, and for some women it can take several months.

Here are a few more tips to help speed your recovery from a C-section:

• Accept help. As simple as it sounds, it can make a world of difference. Many women are used to doing everything themselves. But this is not the time to be superwoman. Husbands, siblings, parents, friends, and even in-laws make great helpers. If they offer, take them up on it!

• Take it nice and slowly. Many women feel okay by that six-to-eight-week mark, but if you’re not among them, don’t do anything that makes you uncomfortable. Overexerting yourself can actually prolong the healing process.

• Don’t neglect your bowels. If you’re taking pain medications, be aware that certain types can cause constipation, which in itself can become a serious problem. Make sure that your bowel movements are regular, and if this starts to become an issue, speak with your health care provider. Stool softeners and laxatives might be necessary.

• Accept the mess. With tons of foot traffic through your home and visits from your extended family, your house may get messy. But you’re recovering, so leave it. This is a great opportunity to ask your mother-in-law to help clean up. Even if the mess causes you stress, it’s better to leave it for someone else to handle than for you to overexert yourself. Believe me, there will be many messes in the future you can dirty your hands with!

The above excerpt is a digitally scanned reproduction of text from print. Although this excerpt has been proofread, occasional errors may appear due to the scanning process. Please refer to the finished book for accuracy.

Regaine And Nourkrin – The Impact Of Hair Loss In Women From Pharmacy2u

Hair loss is very difficult to accept and deal with for men, just think what it is like for women. However, if you can acknowledge the common causes of female hair loss you can take many steps to either prevent it or reduce its seriousness.

The Most Common Cause of Hair Loss in Women

Since female bodies work completely differently to male bodies, the leading cause of hair loss in women is – surprisingly – not genetic. It is actually hormonal. Changes in the levels of hormones, such as those seen during the menopause, thyroid conditions, pregnancy, the irregular usage of ‘The Pill’ or hormone replacement therapy, can actually cause temporary hair loss amongst the fairer sex.

When the level of hormones – like oestrogen or testosterone – in the body fluctuate, changes in the body that lead on from this can lead to the loss of hair. As an example, when a woman gives birth, her hormones may enter dormant phase while her body goes back to its state of pre-pregnancy. During this period of time – usually 3 to 6 months after giving birth – women may endure an increase in the rate of hair loss. Thankfully, this kind of hair loss is almost always only temporary and tends to settle down up to a year after giving birth.

Other Causes of Hair Loss in Women

If hormonal fluctuations turn out to not be responsible for hair loss in women, it could be stimulated by harmful hair care techniques, an unhealthy diet, stress, or illness. There could also be a hereditary element; if your female ancestors suffered with hair loss issues, chances are you could suffer too.

Since the majority of women spend a very long time styling and shaping their hair, this over-handling can sometimes lead to excessive hair loss. Perming, coloring or bleaching your hair can cause temporary and sometimes permanent damage to the hair follicles and thus lead to hair loss. Aggressive brushing, and shampooing can also contribute to hair loss in women.

Some illnesses such as anemia and infections can also lead to hair loss. Stress is a mitigating factor and will almost certainly lead to a rise in the level of hormones circulating throughout the bloodstream. The hormonal fluctuations – as mentioned above – can also cause problems with the processes in the body that are responsible for hair growth. Infection will disrupt the regular function of the body and cause problems with regular hair growth.

Another regular of hair loss in women is an unbalanced and poor diet. Women who follow an incredibly strict diet (low-carbohydrate diets especially) and lose weight too quickly can experience temporary hair loss, as can women who don’t consumer enough protein, essential fatty acids, zinc or vitamins through food consumption.

The other leading cause of hair loss in women is the same as in men. Female pattern baldness is a hereditary condition that arises as a result of a sensitivity to testosterone and other ‘androgens’ in the body. When these hormones are converted into a molecule known as DHT (dihydroxytestosterone) it begins a process to a situation where the hair follicles shut down production of new hair, causing baldness. Although the female incarnation is very similar to male pattern baldness, the hair loss experienced is almost always less severe.

Eliminating the Common Causes of Hair Loss

Since almost all causes of hair loss in females are temporary, there are many things that you can to do in order to help eliminate your condition. A good place to start is by following a healthy and balanced diet plan to ensure that you are getting all of your nutrients that you require in order to promote optimal hair growth. To further reduce your chance of hair loss, add a regular exercise program to your plan. Exercising will optimise the delivery of the proper nutrients to your hair follicles and will definitely reduce the effects that stress can have on your body.

You can also take steps to reduce the level of damage that you do to your hair during regular styling. If you chemically treat or colour your hair, consider stopping before permanent damage can be done. You should also try using a gentle shampoo, gentle hair care techniques you must avoid wearing tight hairstyles as this can exacerbate hair loss.

Although it is impossible to eliminate illness, certain hormonal changes, or your genetics, it is possible to take extra precautions in order help protect your hair growth. If you do fall ill, you should talk to your G.P. about ways you can prevent loss of your hair. If you become pregnant, are going through the menopause, or are experiencing other hormonal changes, be extra-careful with your hair, use a shampoo that is formulated for increasing your hair’s body and volume. Additionally, you should be eating foods that are rich in soy in order to help protect hormonal health.

Although hair loss in women is a major thing, it is usually only temporary and much easier to control once you understand its causes and the options that are available to you.

Top 10 Calf Exercises

Calf exercises play a significant role in the proper functioning of your calf muscles. Placed on the legs’ lower back area – calf muscles are regarded as indispensable to enhance your overall physical health, and involve two prime muscle groups such as the gastrocnemius and the soleus muscles, both of which are responsible for any kind of movement pertaining to your lower leg as well as feet. However, calf muscles could function effectively only if they are healthy and strong. Here comes the importance of calf exercises. Some of the incredible benefits of calf exercises are enhanced aerobic movements, improved speed and agility, reduced impact during jumping or running, reduction of discomforts that occur during periods, and reduced stress. Further discussed in this article are the top calf exercises.

Standing Calf Raises

This exercise is effective for the functioning of both the gastrocnemius and the soleus muscles. Standing calf raises can be performed anywhere on a step. However, for best results, it would be better if you could do it on a gym machine.

Seated Calf Raises

Seated calf raises are especially designed to improve the performance of the soleus muscles, which is made up of type I slow twitch muscle fibers. The movements involved in this exercise are considered excellent to tone and shape your calf muscles. Prior to starting this exercise, it is important to ensure that you use the right machine and appropriate weight in order to carry out the preferred amount of reps.

Exercise Ball Calf Raises

Exercise Ball Calf Raises is one of the most comfortable as well as the easiest ways to strengthen and develop your calves. It can be done at home, and all you require to perform this exercise is an exercise ball.

Calf Exercise with Weights

This exercise promotes for a strong, healthy calf muscles. First of all, sit on a chair or a bench while keeping your feet straight on the floor. Hold the weight in such a way that it should be placed across your thighs. Raise your toes a little off the floor. Maintain this for one to two seconds.

Single Leg Swiss Ball Calf Raises

This is yet another exercise to strengthen your calf muscles. It can be done using a Swiss ball and two dumbbells. Place the Swiss Ball on the wall, and then keep your chest against it. As the next step, keep a dumbbell in each hand. Then slowly lift your one feet and lower down.

Plyometrics

A great exercise to build calf muscles as well as develop explosive strength, plyometric work-outs are on the basis of muscle elasticity principle. However, this work-out program is not recommended for beginners.

Sports

All sports with sprinting as well as changing movements are considered excellent for building the calves. Among the exercises that are effective to build and strengthen calf muscles are weight lifting, football, tennis, soccer, and track and field.

Vertical Activities

Undertaking vertical activities such as hiking, climbing up stairs, and running atop the hill are regarded highly effective to build and strengthen your calf muscles. Both gastrocnemius and soleus are contracted with greater tension during vertical activities, which in turn is equivalent to several times your body’s weight.

Cycling

Cycling is also a perfect way to develop your calf muscles, as it allows the gastrocnemius and the soleus to work for longer periods.

Forward Bent Lunge

This calf exercise should be done using weights. First of all, hold weights and bring it up towards the shoulders. Then, step towards the front in a lunge posture while slightly bending your waist. Come back to the starting position in order to continue the same process with another leg.